Condo Law Digest – October 2018

Macaca fuscata meditation.jpg

Metropolitan Toronto Condominium Corporation No. 596 v. Best View Dining Ltd., 2018 ONSC 5058
Decision Date: September 4, 2018
http://canlii.ca/t/htssb

This is a motion in an on-going dispute between a commercial tenant and a mixed-use condominium corporation, stemming from noise complaints. In September 2017 MTCC No. 596 obtained an order requiring Best View Dining to abate the noise disturbing residential owners. The noise problems persisted, and in November 2017 MTCC No. 596 brought a contempt motion. Justice Perell became seized of the matter in April 2018. He put off consideration of the contempt motion, reserved the matter of costs, and made an interim order requiring more steps to address the noise problems. MTCC No. 596 alleges that they incurred close to $39,000 in legal fees and engineering costs between November 2017 and May 2018. They asked Best View Dining for reimbursement and informed them that if they didn’t pay, the amount would be added to their common expenses. Best View did not pay, and in July 2018 the corporation registered a lien.

In this motion, Best View Dining seeks an order from the court discharging the lien. They argue that the lien was premature, given that there had been no ruling on the contempt motion. Justice Perell found that the lien was proper and dismissed the motion. Best View’s “real objection,” he charged, was that MTCC No. 596 was “presumptuously writing itself a blank cheque” before the court could review the claim for costs. However if there was an overcharge, this could be resolved upon the return of the contempt motion. If the contempt motion never comes back, then the dispute over the amount of the lien could be resolved under the Mortgages Act.

Comment: Let’s hope, for everyone’s sake, that there is some technological solution to the noise problem.

Taft Management Inc. v Gentile, 2018 CanLII 82880 (ON SCSM)
Decision Date: August 27, 2018
http://canlii.ca/t/htth4

The defendant is the chairman of the board of TSCC No. 2003. Following a November 2016 board meeting he sent two emails to the rest of the board, raising concerns about the performance of the plaintiff, at that time the property manager of the condo. Taft somehow obtained copies of these emails, and found that they contained “false and damaging” statements. Taft brought a claim against Gentile, and in this motion, Gentile asks the court to dismiss the claim based on anti-SLAPP provisions.

(SLAPP is “strategic litigation against public participation.” The legislation is intended to encourage freedom of expression on matters of public interest.)

Justice Prattas dismissed the motion, saying that the matters discussed in the emails were “communications related to matters involving the everyday affairs at the Condo” and not in the public interest. The plaintiff’s claim can proceed to trial, and the parties will bear their own costs.

Comment: Mediation can be highly effective in disputes such as this, where feelings run high and the financial stakes are relatively low.

About the image: Monkey enjoying a quiet moment by Daisuke tashiro from Japan – snow monkey, CC BY-SA 2.0, Link

Posted in Condo Disputes.

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